Saturday, June 25, 2016

WHO NOT TO VOTE FOR; FOLLOW THE MONEY

One way of knowing who the person you are voting for is representing you is to look at who they are getting money from.



Bernie Sanders, for example was getting almost all of his campaign money from the people that were voting for him; in his case it was actually the "people" with the average contribution being around $27.00



One look at Hillary's campaign coffers tell another story.



Hillary is not shy about taking cash from big money donors and has no problem playing the "pay for play" game the wealthy power brokers get richer playing.



Then, there's Trump; a self proclaimed billionaire who has the political Establishment's panties in a twist because he has been able to literally destroy a carload of clowns that were backed by millions of dollars from the people they whored themselves out to.



Surprisingly Trump has been able to survive this far without near as much cash as Hillary which the main stream media is playing up as a "bad" rather than "good" thing.



It's amazing that both the media and political Establishment are still so tone deaf that they haven't figured out that voters don't look positively at candidates with bags of cash from rich donors in their coffers.



Many voters are awake and realize that candidates who take money from big money donors pander to them in return and it's necessarily not in the voters best interest.



The 2008 Wall Street meltdown is a prime example of what happens when politicians are beholden to big money donors.






Given Trump’s less-than-stellar performance as a fundraiser so far, might he think about taking public funding for the general election portion of the campaign? It’s an odd prospect, given Trump’s oft-touted wealth — even if he’s not quite as rich as he claims to be.

But there is a $96.1 million grant waiting for him should he say the word.

“People shortchange that program,” said campaign finance attorney Trevor Potter, who was the lawyer for McCain’s campaign in 2008; McCain was the last general election candidate to accept public funds.