Friday, May 3, 2013

‘just one of those crazy accidents.’

  THE ASYLUM: For the care of people, especially those with physical or mental impairments, who require organized supervision or assistance. 

Kentucky girl, 2, shot dead by brother, 5, who was playing with gun he'd been given as a gift 
Johann Wagener 5-3-13


                                                                    ACCIDENT? NO!


Any society that condones the manufacturing and sale of guns specifically made for children is sorely lacking in both common sense and morals. Clearly the issue of parental responsibility is at the center of this tragedy. But against the backdrop of the Newtown massacre and ongoing national debate over regulating firearms, it also points back to the big business of guns—including how the industry profits from products aimed at children.
The Pennsylvania-based maker of Crickett rifles, Keystone Sporting Arms, markets its guns with the slogan "My First Rifle." They are available with different barrel and stock designs, including some made in hot pink to appeal to young girls.






CRAZY? YES!



Any parent in their right state of mind would not give 5 yr. old a rifle; especially a loaded one, to play with. 
Kentucky girl, 2, shot dead by brother, 5, who was playing with gun he'd been given as a gift 
Any coroner in their right state of mind would not rule that the killing of a 2 year old child at the hand of this 5yr old was just a “crazy accident” when it was without a doubt a terrible case of child abuse and endangerment.

THE SHOOTER AND HIS TARGET


Caroline Sparks, 2, was killed after being shot by her 5-year-old sibling with his own .22 caliber rifle. The county coroner has ruled the death ‘just one of those crazy accidents.’

OUR RIGHT TO ABUSE OUR CHILDREN

Sarah Palin and the NRA would like you to believe that the 2nd Amendment protects the rights of 5 year old children to own guns.  For those that agree you should consider a padded cell next to Sarah’s.





WHO'S EXPLOITING OUR CHILDREN 




Read more; Here's How the Rifle That Just Killed a 2-Year-Old Girl Is Marketed for Kids